Multitasking and Collaborating.

I was asked to deliver a session on multitasking to a group of illustrators at the SCBWI conference in Winchester last week-end. Jack-of- all-Trades: How to Have Multiple Careers as an Illustrator looked at choosing the right activities to complement and benefit your core practice as an illustrator of children’s picture books, getting the balance right and recognizing the boundaries? I also ran a hands-on activity where illustrators flexed their creative muscles in a mini workshop combining pop-up design and illustration.

I think multitasking is inevitable when you’re a self-employed creative, especially when dealing with the day-to-day running of your business. However, is it a good idea to diversify creatively, to expand your activities in different directions or even to add to your skill set. It does encourage thinking outside the box, leads to cross pollination of ideas over different disciplines and helps create new income streams. However, does diversifying stretch you too thin and can the problems outweigh the benefits?

For me, what started out as a plan to be an illustrator, turned into an ambition to illustrate and write books. This was followed by the desire to add paper engineering to the mix as well author visits and family workshops.

Something that was quite simple to begin with, turned into a practice that has encompassed schools visits, talks and workshops on how to create your own pop-up books, editorial illustration, card design, pop-up picture books, public art trails and other collaborations with artists, not to mention co-creating a number of children’s theatre productions. This is further complicated by the fact that it’s all done as a joint business with an artist wife with a great deal of crossover between both practices.

I think problems arise when one strand takes over and dominates to the detriment of everything else. It can be very easy to lose sight of your initial goals and to forget what’s really important. It’s also possible to become so immersed in a project that you fail to measure what you’re actually getting out of it – it’s not always a good thing to let your passion get the better of you.

I think it’s always helpful to have an idea of what you hope achieve from your activities and what proportion of your time you want to spend on each thing. If one area becomes neglected, it’s time to address that. Always place your projects in order of priority and importance. With each one, you need to balance the equation: does the time, work and money spent equal the income received plus other benefits. Think about soft benefits – recognition, exposure, does it lead to other opportunities, are you gaining valuable experience?

With collaborations, sometimes you need to tread carefully. Before you start illustrating (or writing) your best friend’s story, think about whether a publisher is likely to accept the whole package. If not, would you be happy with that and is it worth losing a friendship over? With any collaboration, be clear what it is you want from it and what should happen in any given scenario – then get it all down in writing and signed by all concerned.

In my opinion most long-term collaborations have a finite lifespan; the key is to know when it’s time to stop. The ones that continue past their sell-by-date risk creating negativity and spoiling any residual benefit that continued contact and friendship generate.

Dream collaborations do happen – those rare situations where two or more people speak more highly of each other than they do of themselves in an atmosphere of mutual respect, loyalty and transparency. Egos and glory-hunting take a back seat in an arrangement where no one’s bigger that the whole picture. These are the ones you should definitely embrace.

Examples from the mini hands-on workshop combining illustration and pop-up design. The workshop recreated something I do in schools and hopefully shows that by adding something extra, you tick more boxes and increase your appeal. Pop ups by Dave Gray and Rita Lazaro

 

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Verulamium Workshops

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Pop-up Roman Kitchen

IMG_0688I’ll be running two half-term workshops at the Verulamium Museum (The Museum of Everyday Life in Roman Britain) in St. Albans next month. Verulamium was the third largest city of Roman Britain and the museum stands on the site of the Roman town.

Both workshops are based around the theme of the Roman kitchen, allowing  plenty of scope for food, implements, vessels, tools, pets and other rooms in the background. Workshop 1 will consist of making simple individual pop-up frameworks and adding the various elements to build up a 3D picture.

Workshop 2 (free) is a drop-in session where you get to help co-create a giant work of three dimensional art! The children will create and add the elements to a large pre-prepared, collapsible, cardboard framework, using the museum’s exhibits for inspiration. The finished piece will be displayed at the museum for a short period of time.

Further information about the workshops and the museum:

http://www.stalbansmuseums.org.uk/whats-on/roman-paper-engineering-bookable-session-457/

http://www.stalbansmuseums.org.uk/whats-on/roman-paper-engineering-drop-in-session-458/

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WORD2017

The Word Festival is an innovative programme of activities, events and workshops focusing on and exploring the pleasure of reading, writing and freedom of expression in Islington. Launched in 2012, and delivered annually since then, the Word Festival Programme is a partnership initiative between Islington Council’s Library and Heritage Services, Arts Service, All Change and Free Word.

This year artist Irma Irsara and I are proud to co-produce an event with Word17 at Finsbury Park Trust on Saturday 17th June (full details below). We’ll be running two workshops in pop-up design, illustration and wordplay for small children and their families. Make your very own pop-up creations by learning to develop basic mechanisms to create more complex designs, all in easy-to-follow steps.

It’s also an opportunity to develop spatial awareness and explore ideas of transformation while practicing construction and craft-making skills. At the same time, we will be exploring descriptive wordplay in a fun and accessible way.

The starting point is the idea of someone special to you and how you would describe them using individual words and phrases. We are also interested in the idea of different languages. The event is targeted at younger children who are beginning to connect words and construct sentences.

The workshops are free and all materials are supplied – you just bring the creativity.

Suitable for children age 5 and upwards along with parents and carers.

Saturday 17th June 2017, 11am – 1pm & 2 – 4pm

Finsbury Park Trust, 225-229 Seven Sisters Road, London N4 2DF

No booking required – arrive early to avoid disappointment.

See the full Word programme here: Word Festival Brochure 2017

Below are images from our Word events in 2014 with Islington Museum.

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Pop-up Easter Card

For those who missed my workshop at the Geffrye Museum last week, fear not, here’s the tutorial. Learn two mechanisms and create a chick that flies out of an egg, before coming up with some designs of your own.
The workshop was organized by Hackney Arts as part of their Kids Who Can – Easter Arts Club. Check out some of the creations from the day at the bottom of the post, including a few alternative designs.

 

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All In It Together

Below are some examples of the great work produced by the kids at my workshop at the Verulamium Museum, St Albans yesterday.

The workshop was linked to a bigger project, All In It Together, run St Albans Arts Team, with the aim of exploring ideas of propaganda versus reality with particular reference to World War 1 – a lot of the posters were produced at the time by St Albans based printers Dangerfields at the time.

The children created swing cards with pop-up elements which showed transformation from slogan-based designs to depictions of destroyed landscapes inspired by the work of Paul Nash. Some wanted to depict other wars – WW2, the Blitz, evacuation – creating narratives around stories they heard from grandparents, parents or school.

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British International School Budapest

IMG_0112Back from Budapest where I spent time working with the kids and staff at the British International School. I was helped by the school’s wonderful librarian who acted as my wing-woman for the entire 3 days and made sure everything ran to schedule.

After my initial school talk, I ran a series of workshops with all classes where I showed the children how to make their own pop-up books.

A pattern for the sessions emerged fairly early on when I matched each class to a mechanism, guiding them through the process so they all had a completed pop-up framework ready to go. Following a discussion about their storyboard ideas – the blank storyboards were sent ahead of my arrival – I used some of their material to demonstrate how to convert mechanism into fully illustrated 3D scene. Some of the images show these, others show the children’s work-in-progress.

The school places huge importance on reading and runs several initiatives to encourage the love of books. At a certain point each day, everyone drops everything to read for five minutes. The doors were also being decorated as book covers while I was there – check out the Detective Paws ‘door cover’.

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Pop-up Beard Book

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If you like beards and pop-up books and have young children, then this is the workshop for you.

Make your own beard-themed pop-up creation in my next hands-on, half-term workshop at the Florence Nightingale Museum. For my return visit to this lovely venue located within St ThomasHospital, I’m taking my  inspiration from ‘The Age of the Beard’ exhibition currently on show there to deliver  three 1-hour family sessions 6encompassing 3D paper skills, design and illustration.

Learn how to make pop-ups with moving parts and how to assemble a finished book.

The workshops are suitable for 5+ with parents and carers. Adults will be encouraged  to take part but don’t worry, no experience necessary and results are guaranteed.  Materials will be provided, you just bring the creativity!

The workshops are free but normal entry fee to the museum applies. Booking is recommended.

Family Workshop: Pop-up Beards!
Wednesday 15 February, 11.00-12.30, 1.30-3.00 & 3.00-4.30

Admission
This workshop is free with admission

Booking details
Places are limited, to book please visit https://billetto.co.uk/en/users/the-florence-nightingale-museum-trust

Venue
Florence Nightingale Museum, 2 Lambeth Palace Road, London SE1 7EW

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Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week

theos-carbon-monoxide-monster

npower_co_infographicAs part of CO Awareness week last November, I was one of six illustrators asked to re-interpret drawings of the invisible CO monster by a group of young children. We were given the freedom to eloborate but without radically departing from the basic design – it had to be recognisable as the image it was based on.

Apart from five year old Theo’s drawing, the only other information I was given by the client (Propellernet) was that apparently ‘the monster’s right ear makes him go invisible, and his left ear makes him visible again’.

Interpreting the drawing required a little bit of guesswork – some parts were obvious and some, not so much. I think Theo started the body in the usual way – I could see 3 white snowman-type circles – before adding more ghostly, gassy, swirly ‘invisible’ shapes. There’s two feet at the very bottom which I made more flowing. I quite liked the idea of incorporating all Theo’s markings into the design as well. I wasn’t  sure what the blue lines near the bottom were, maybe they were there to give the idea of the gas as a flame.

I could clearly see a mouth which could be turned into a definite feature but I wasn’t quite sure what the red lines on either side were – fumes? I added them anyway as extra arm / tentacle things. The hair/gas at the top seemed fairly clear to me but I wasn’t sure if the black thing sticking on the right-hand side was an arm. Is it an arm?

There’s a video of all the children on Youtube – part of the campaign against the invisible killer. Some facts about our awareness of Carbon Monoxide and it’s dangers can be found on the stats. sheet above. Do your research and get informed – it could save your life.

http://www.co-gassafety.co.uk/
http://www.katiehainestrust.com/co-gas-safety/

co-gas-monster-01

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Cardboard Calendar

6The brief was to design and deliver a workshop /activity making a calendar with the Hackney Coffee Club on Mare Street for people with mild to moderate dementia and their carers. I wanted everyone to go away with a hand-made object that was sturdy, lightweight, practical and useful.

The solution: a desktop calendar that came in three parts which slotted together. Holes were were made in the cardboard and the sheets were attached with split-pin paper fasteners. The aim was to create an activity that involved a range of relatively simple tasks plus the final decorating stage.

I tried to encourage individual creativity and was gratified to see some very interesting results not only with abstract combinations of colour and shape but also cut-out imagery which, in some cases, reflected different countries.

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